Beer Questions

#1

Anyone have a home Keg dispenser?

I am thinking of either modding a fridge or purchasing a home system, and was wondering if anyone had already done so. I looked into the haier and Danby models and like what I see - I know I’ll have to also get a U System So I can tap a guiness keg

I want a dual regulator too, and if it goes where I’m planning, a drain would be be nice for the tap area too.

#2

No beer here.

Where did this come from? Nobody saw you yesterday? That is odd.

#3

let me know how it works, OK? I’m afraid I’d be the only one drinking off of it in my house, worried that the beer would go bad.

#4

I did a fridge mod. It’s easier if you either drill through the side, or find a really old fridge with the flat panel on the inside of the door. (which is what I did.)

I mounted a pair of shelf brackets to the outside of the door to place a drip tray. No plumbed drain on this setup, but it was too far from plumbing to have hooked it up anyway.

Found room for the CO2 tank inside (which makes it nice in that only the hole for the tap needs to be cut in the skin of the fridge.) Attached a short length of light gauge chain to the inside of the fridge to use as a safety for the Co2 tank. Straps or a fire extinguisher mount would also work.

As I remember, the kit itself was not too expensive.

#5

Your own keg of Guinness!? Woo-hoo! Did I ever tell you I’m a rodent person?

#6

What’s the Co2 for?

#7

To pressurize the kegs once they’re hooked up so beer will flow through the tap.

#8

Also helps keep the beer from going flat too fast (which is what would happen if you just used compressed air.)

#9

Ahh, that makes sense.

#10

Why not use nitrous oxide? Get a two-fer with every glass of beer.

#11

Nitro is actually used with thicker beer, such as stouts. If I remember correctly it is used with Guiness. Make sure you run that system at around 10 psi and keep the fridge the right temp. Too warm and it will foam like crazy. Too cold and you could freeze the line. You will get good flow and the right amount of head at around 34-38 degrees.You will also need to get a clean tank so you can clean the system every few kegs. If you get too much yeast buildup it will flow badly and the beer may start to get a weird taste to it. You may want to check with your local beer distributor too see if you can purchase parts from them. You may be able to build it for cheaper. If you are afraid of the beer going bad, you can get a smaller keg. Kegs, depending on the brewery and what the distributor carries, come in 1/2, 1/4, and 1/6 barrels.

#12

Yup; keeping the lines clean is very important - not just for taste - but for health reasons, as well.

#13

I used to work in a microbrewery. I think your aim is too low. Go for the whole in-house brewing, fermenting, and kegging operation. It smells lovely.

#14

I learned today that wisky is different from beer.

#15

And wisky is different from whisky which is different from whiskey which is also different from beer. :tongue:

#16

I had a girlfriend who loved to take shots of whikey.

#17

Many of us have started with whiskey and ended with whickey!!

#18

What a sticky wicket.

What the hell is a sticky wicket anyway?

#19

I think it has to do with British cricket . . .

#20

British crickets have sticky wickets!!!