Bondic Kits and Refills


Bondic Kits and Refills

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I bought this last time on Woot. I absolutely love being able to repair things I typically would have thrown away. Favorite fix so far was my roomba’s waste receptacle door. I formed a new U joint by wiggling and curing at the same time.

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The roomba uses U joints for that door? Usually they’re used for rotating parts. Interesting.

Is this safe ro repair aquarium decorations made of plasric?

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Yes. It contains no solvent, which is the major fish-killer in aquarium applications. You need to understand the adding-a-layer thickness limitations, because if you try to go too “thick” with a layer, the deepest part of the new resin may not “cure” properly (if the UV light can’t get thru the material above that depth). That reduces the strength of the cured mass, and if it does crack with applied forces you could have uncured resin interacting with your fish. But remember this stuff comes from dental repair technology, i.e. gets used in rebuilding peoples’ TEETH (biting forces!), and gets shaped easily with things much like dremel tools. It is an ingenious expansion of materials tech into larger niche applications…

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Have to remember, this stuff is not STICKY, it is not glue. It works by solidifying within surface textures (like the nooks and crannies of jigsaw puzzle pieces) and by wrapping around features. It won’t stick to a flat surface, but will stick to a roughed-up surface…

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Got it, understood it but just wanted to be 100 percent sure. Basically just melting what is there already and then putting back to a solid. Thank you.

Does this work on a hairline crack in a plate glass window?

Not really, because it is “not glue”, and if it doesn’t have any surface imperfections to “grab” when it is “cured” then it will mostly just peel off at some unfortunate time.

Not quite, almost, and close enough. If you use sandpaper etc to put scratches in the surface then the resin fills in those scratches and now can get a strong “grip” on the surface. This started out as dental repair material (strong!) and some ingenious person saw an opportunity…

Interesting! I always assumed it was adapted from “Gel Nails” technology (or maybe that was adapted from the dental application too…?).