Fuji EnviroMAX Batteries


Fuji EnviroMAX Batteries

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Where are these made? They are only a few dollars cheaper than the Made in USA batteries available at Sam’s Club.

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Not sure where they are made, I’ll see if I still have the packaging. However, the selling point of these batteries is that they are created with the environment in mind. The packaging is also environmentally friendly- alkaline batteries made in the USA don’t claim to be environmentally friendly, in terms of production or packaging.
http://fujibatteries.com/product-line/fuji-enviromax

I really like these batteries, they’ve lasted a long time and I don’t need more yet, but I will definitely purchase again. I also like that the AA & AAA come in little packages of 4 (plastic is recyclable) so I can keep some with my flashlight. Vs the batteries spilling out of the giant pack, like what happens with the other name brands.

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I just want to add that in my experience, the AAA perform better and last longer than the AA. My use is mostly flashlights/spot lights and a few kids toys.

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Hmm, you bring up a good point But lets look at it from a few angles. People don’t b uy batteries because of their packaging. You can buy bulk of any brand and they are enclosed inside a cardboard package (at least the ones I buy are, Energizer). But thinking you are really making a difference to the environment of the compounds used might be negated by the fact of people suffering to make these batteries. But in the end, if you, I and others REALLY want to save the planet, use rechargeable batteries, or ones that last TWICE as long so there’s less batteries to throw away.


[MOD: Removed off-topic part of the post]

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I agree that rechargeable batteries are usually the best option. However, there is an amount of charges it takes to make the batteries actually offset the impact of the throwaway kind. Rechargeable batteries do contain the toxic ingredients that the single use do not. You can look it up, but I recall it being something like 500 recharges to offset what it takes to produce the battery.

That said, there are instances when single use batteries are preferable to to rechargeable. Rechargeable aren’t nearly as reliable in long term storage (plus defeats the multiple charge aspect) and when away from home or a reliable power source and in emergency situations, single use batteries are often a better choice.

Hell there are even batteries built for specific performance reasons, but that is beyond the scope of these batteries.

I simply stated what I like about and my personal experience with these batteries. I like these for travel and the packaging is better suited for that vs the big package of energizer that leaves them rolling all over and out of the package.

Last but not least, everyone should do their own research on how they can lessen their environmental burden. Not all solutions fit everyone and not everyone who sounds like they know what they’re talking about actually does. That’s why credentials matter.

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On the contrary Mod. If the discussion is reference to the ECO part of the product, it’s not off topic to provide a source pointing out the manufacture in question doesn’t have the best record in making these products ECO.

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Yes, I agree. People should do their own research. I’ve seen two sons from tiger cub to eagle scout. We have spent many days camping and I’ve burned through many sets of batteries of every size that will fit in lanterns, flashlights, GPS devices, etc…

I’ve tried to use rechargeable which as you pointed out, isn’t the best for certain applications and you need not only a way to charge them in the field (thanks solar panels) but you need to take a few more sets with you. Thanks to the advances of LED bulbs, they seem to last longer. Of all the batteries I’ve used, Energizers have seem to lasted the longest and didn’t destroy the devices they were used in. The Delco’s Woot is selling, my god, next to Duracell’s, they seem to be the worst at leakage. I’ve used Duracell and Energizer rechargeable. I can’t tell the difference.

Would you use this brand of battery in your smoke or carbon dioxide detectors?

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I’d use the AAA of this brand, for sure. The AA I’d use but would probably be a bit skeptical, if I’m being honest. But I’m a bit traumatized from the house I lived in college, where the landlord only used cheap off brand batteries and they had to be changed practically every other month. Once I got a tall enough ladder, I put in energizers myself.

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They are made in China. It’s stamped on the AA and AAA sizes.

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They are made in China

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Today the only types of batteries in the United States that contain mercury are button cell batteries and mercuric oxide batteries.

https://www.energizer.com/responsibility
– During the 1990’s, Energizer ® removed Mercury and Cadmium from all household batteries (AAA, AA, C, D and 9V)

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The pack of 48 AA and 48 AAA works out to $0.25 per battery. Costco’s Kirkland batteries are about $0.33 each.

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Yep, and they work very well.

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