Hunter Thermostats

Wow $14 for a programmable thermostat. I bought this same model probably 4 years ago and it’s still going strong. Probably have to replace the AA’s maybe once a year. Has good features such as M-F (breaks the day up into 4 sections which are programmable…morning, day, evening, overnight). Saturday-Sunday are programmed seperately in 4 sections also. Has a recovery mode i.e., will kick on AC early …for example if you were at work all day and therefore rooms will be up to temp by the time you get to home. Has a filter replacement indicator (I think its based on fan hours…goes a little long in my opinion). Easy to install.

can these be used with radiant floor or ceiling type heating systems?

bad reviews for the $27, and it is about the same price everywhere online.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_90432-79-44660_0__?productId=3047181&cm_mmc=search_google--Heating%20%26%20Cooling_RTC--Hunter_44660-_-hunter%2044660

Yes, the $27 model sucks big time as most of the programmable Hunter models. The better ones do not need batteries as they draw their power from the A/C-Heating system.

$14 for a programmable thermostat for a house we are going to sell anyway? Done.

I’ve got whatever the remote variant of the 44660 is (the one that uses a wireless thermometer to keep your room at room temperature rather than trying to make the unheated hallway room temperature). Remote thermostats are $ridiculous and hard to find, so I put up with its quirks, but it might be more annoying in the plain incarnation.

Batteries: It doesn’t like NiMHs and will always complain they’re low; in the wireless version the receiver in the thermostat also doesn’t play well and starts to lose its mind at NiMH voltage. The iGo rechargeable alkalines that Woot keeps selling are thus terrific because they’re 1.5v - but since I forget to charge them before they’re run down they sometimes only last a month or start showing ‘low’ and misbehaving real quick (cured by another cycle through the charger). Store-brand disposable alkalines last like 3-5 months, a name brand that works well in low-drain applications might hit the 5 end of that.

Batteries do mean you don’t lose the programming during a power outage, but it’s not nonvolatile so leave them out too long and you’re reprogramming. (Guessing most of the line-powered ones are probably nonvolatile by now.)

Programming is a little weird - you get 2 or 4 slots per day (toggled with an undocumented button, and the programming slots show as either [1][2][3][4] or [1] [4] on the display), programming cycles through something like ‘Weekdays,’ ‘Weekends’ to fill the 7 day slots and then if you keep pressing the button you can review or rewrite individual days. If you look-but-don’t-touch the ‘Weekday’ setting it won’t disturb individual days but if you touch it it ‘overwrites’ whatever you had set for Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri. Gets easier when you use it a few times.

The 2 vs. 4 slot thing is a little silly but preserves some sanity vs. entering the same temperature and see below re: interaction with temperature ‘Recovery’ option.

It has a ‘filter check’ timer that you can’t turn off, which is a little weird if you have baseboards without an air filter, but is also a rough reminder to look at or reset the seasonal energy usage counters and compare to last year.

Decent deadband and related controls to tweak it (confusing until you figure out what works best for your setup) … the ‘Recovery’ feature that tries to guarantee a set temperature by the programmed time can overshoot since it basically decides if it thinks it needs to run the furnace or AC for the preceding 30 minutes or so - then does it even if it passes the set point. This is why it has the ability to knock the program slots down to 2 a day - if you use 4 but all set to the same temperature it’ll still apply the strained logic 4 times a day (instead of twice) if ‘Recovery’ is on.

The “Home today” button is great although I think most programmables have it now. IIRC it always resets at midnight, so if you want a full 24 hours of warm starting late at night without getting up to push it again you’re better off setting up a 1 or 2 day “Vacation” and just remembering to clear that if you’re as unsure as I am how long a ‘Vacation’ day lasts when you start it at 9PM.

Slightly awful: At least on my production run, one of the shortcuts PRINTED INSIDE THE LID OF THE UNIT is WRONG! Something stupid and minor like whether you press ‘Return’ or ‘Clear’ to clear vacation mode, but it will trip you up every time unless you want to take a Sharpie to it.

WOW YOU EITHER TYPE FAST OR HAVE WAY TO MUCH TIME ON YOUR HANDS!user=“furryfloid”]I’ve got whatever the remote variant of the 44660 is (the one that uses a wireless thermometer to keep your room at room temperature rather than trying to make the unheated hallway room temperature). Remote thermostats are $ridiculous and hard to find, so I put up with its quirks, but it might be more annoying in the plain incarnation.

Batteries: It doesn’t like NiMHs and will always complain they’re low; in the wireless version the receiver in the thermostat also doesn’t play well and starts to lose its mind at NiMH voltage. The iGo rechargeable alkalines that Woot keeps selling are thus terrific because they’re 1.5v - but since I forget to charge them before they’re run down they sometimes only last a month or start showing ‘low’ and misbehaving real quick (cured by another cycle through the charger). Store-brand disposable alkalines last like 3-5 months, a name brand that works well in low-drain applications might hit the 5 end of that.

Batteries do mean you don’t lose the programming during a power outage, but it’s not nonvolatile so leave them out too long and you’re reprogramming. (Guessing most of the line-powered ones are probably nonvolatile by now.)

Programming is a little weird - you get 2 or 4 slots per day (toggled with an undocumented button, and the programming slots show as either [1][2][3][4] or [1] [4] on the display), programming cycles through something like ‘Weekdays,’ ‘Weekends’ to fill the 7 day slots and then if you keep pressing the button you can review or rewrite individual days. If you look-but-don’t-touch the ‘Weekday’ setting it won’t disturb individual days but if you touch it it ‘overwrites’ whatever you had set for Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri. Gets easier when you use it a few times.

The 2 vs. 4 slot thing is a little silly but preserves some sanity vs. entering the same temperature and see below re: interaction with temperature ‘Recovery’ option.

It has a ‘filter check’ timer that you can’t turn off, which is a little weird if you have baseboards without an air filter, but is also a rough reminder to look at or reset the seasonal energy usage counters and compare to last year.

Decent deadband and related controls to tweak it (confusing until you figure out what works best for your setup) … the ‘Recovery’ feature that tries to guarantee a set temperature by the programmed time can overshoot since it basically decides if it thinks it needs to run the furnace or AC for the preceding 30 minutes or so - then does it even if it passes the set point. This is why it has the ability to knock the program slots down to 2 a day - if you use 4 but all set to the same temperature it’ll still apply the strained logic 4 times a day (instead of twice) if ‘Recovery’ is on.

The “Home today” button is great although I think most programmables have it now. IIRC it always resets at midnight, so if you want a full 24 hours of warm starting late at night without getting up to push it again you’re better off setting up a 1 or 2 day “Vacation” and just remembering to clear that if you’re as unsure as I am how long a ‘Vacation’ day lasts when you start it at 9PM.

Slightly awful: At least on my production run, one of the shortcuts PRINTED INSIDE THE LID OF THE UNIT is WRONG! Something stupid and minor like whether you press ‘Return’ or ‘Clear’ to clear vacation mode, but it will trip you up every time unless you want to take a Sharpie to it.
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I’ll never buy another Hunter Product. I also tried the Hunter Thermostat with the remote reader. I could never get it to sync properly and made the mistake of keeping the main unit anyway.

I found the unit always acting a little off, but one night I came home and my house was 88 degrees! These things have a mind of their own and will cost you if you get a faulty unit.

I strongly suggest spending a few more bucks for a reliable unit from honeywell.

In for 2! Neither for my house!

Either way, the $14 one didn’t have bad reviews on the mothership. Seems everyone is complaining about the more expensive ones!

I ordered 1 $27 unit and got 2. Wonder if they’re hedging their bets. Sent customer service an email. See what happens.