IGLOO COOKIE CUTTER


IGLOO COOKIE CUTTER

The name of this product contains a racial slur.
Woot should take down this item.

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@manlapig

Probably better to say “igloo” cookie cutter…

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Racial slur aside, it’s a dumb title because this is an igloo and not a cookie-cutter depiction of an Inuit person.

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From a more naïve and innocent era where the arcane was considered cute. Hopefully it was never malicious. But honestly, why was chocolate covered vanilla ice cream ever was called that?

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Nor do I approve of using a cookie cutter on a native Inuit.

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Guess my American Eskimo Dogs should go back to being called German Spitz. Although the breeds are different now. American Spitz works.

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Now Eskimo should be “The E Word”?
lol

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Hi everyone - so sorry about the title. I’ve asked our team to change the product name to Igloo cookie cutter. Thanks for alerting me about this.

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hmm… Kind interesting that an event, for and by the local indigenous peoples would use the term Eskimo…

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Thank you @lioncow for going the extra mile on this. In case anyone finds words themselves interesting: Iglu (or Igloo) is an Inuit word for house. It does not have to be a snow hut.

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Yes, if you want to phrase it that way. It was a derogatory phrase imposed by outsiders on Inuit and other Americans in Alaska. Since they do not like it, we should respect their wishes.

Key issues: Inuits have specifically asked people not to use the word as its origins are a put down and they do not refer to themselves as that.

Some people use the term “politically correct” to try to justify lack of tact. We use to encourage mutual respect and even kindness. Let’s bring those back for the good of all.

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People are ridiculous

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Seriously, why not respect the expressed wishes of other people? It used to be common courtesy. To not do so is why many Americans have developed a bad reputation.

We speak of American exceptionalism without understanding how much respect we as a culture have lost in one generation by how we treat people both in the US and when traveling. We cannot earn respect for our economic or social values treating others disrespectfully.

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:grimacing: Dough mutilation was never acceptable behavior.

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Over It Ugh GIF by Billboard Music Awards

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I agree with giving respect BUT it is getting way out of hand being politically correct! Ridiculous is actually a perfect description. JMHO

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I am glad you favor giving respect. The Inuit and other native Americans have for decades asked that people respect their wishes to stop calling them Eskimos. In Alaska, the vast majority have officially recognized and honored that request. So have 2 pieces of national legislation. We can unlearn mispellings and labels. If we have mind able to do so, we should.

What I try to do is abide by how people wish to be addressed. It used to be considered common courtesy to do that and an expectation. It’s how I raised my kiddo to give and receive the respect of others.

It takes virtually no effort to honor such expressed wishes. Makes for a more pleasant world if we do so.

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I’m very confused why Eskimo is a racial slur. What do we use instead of American Eskimo? Is Eskimo pies, Igloo, American Eskimo dog changing their name? I’m not making a funny, I’m seriously confused. Same with Indeginous, I’m confused on that meaning also.

Thank you for asking for more information. “Eskimo” was a name applied by other people implying “outsiders” which was odd since they were the natives. According to some it also was a put down derived from “eaters of raw meat” in some Alaskan dialects. So Inuit and other native (aka indigenous) tribes who have pride in their own identity, ask people to please respect their wishes and not lump all as one - using a term that was sometimes offensive and was never precise. The Alaskan legislature and 2 Federal laws consider the term Eskimo to be inappropriate - so you know it has had a lot of discussion.

Similarly Malaysians, Indians, and Chinese in Singapore all get along remarkably well (homicide rate < 1/100 that of our own) but have very different cultures and languages. None of them like to be called “Orientals” which was a generic term that others used and which is (politely) asked by all of them to be not used. Some old ones accept the term because they are polite and don’t make waves. Their children consider it archaic and rude. I try my best to respect how people ask to be named or identified.

Here is a more in depth definition for indigenous people:
What does indigenous peoples mean? (definitions.net)

Hope this helps. Thank you for trying to be kind to others.

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