Last Post: My final post


#4061

lp


#4062

Dunno… I met her about 5 months ago, but I haven’t seen or heard from her lately…

LP


#4063

Aha !! MY last post.


#4064

So right, and yet so wrong…

LP


#4065

welcome back
lp


#4066

so close, yet so far

LP


#4067

I figured I’d give it 30 minutes, then jump back in. But soon I gotta change buildings, which means no LP fun…

So LP for now.


#4068

last post


#4069

L
a
s
t

P
o
s
t
.


#4070

LP


#4071

45’

LP


#4072

last posting


#4073

Damn, you’se fast.

LP


#4074

78’

45’

LP


#4075

last post


#4076

T
S
O
p

T
S
A
L


#4077

You forgot the forgotten…

16 2/3.

LP


#4078

Last Post


#4079

Never had any of those.

LP


#4080

As recording technology evolved, more specific terms for gramophone or phonograph records would be used to emphasize some aspect of the record, often its nominal rotational speed (“16 2/3 rpm”, “33 1/3 rpm”, “45 rpm”, “78 rpm”) or the material used (particularly “vinyl” to refer to records made of polyvinyl chloride, or the earlier “shellac records”). Less specific terms such as “Long Play” (LP, meaning it was capable of playing for far longer than the old acetate disc records, which typically didn’t go much past 4 minutes per side. An L.P. can play for over forty minutes per side. The 45 rpm discs also came in a variety known as Extended play (EP) which achieved up to 10–15 minutes play at the expense of attenuating (and possibly compressing) the sound to reduce the width required by the groove. EP discs were generally used to reissue LP albums on the smaller format for those people who had only 45 rpm players. LP albums could be purchased 1 EP at a time, with four songs per EP, or in a boxed set with 3 EPs or 12 songs. The large center hole on 45s allows for easier handling by jukebox mechanisms. In modern times it is common that a band will release an “E.P.” of 4 or 5 songs shortly before releasing a full album, or “L.P.”, that hopefully will build a buzz around the new album. The use of these terms no longer has any relation to the physical format (typically compact disc), but rather the length of the album and the number of songs.

Sizes of records in America and the UK are generally measured in inches, usually represented with a double prime symbol, e.g. a 7-inch or 7″ record. 45s are generally 7″ records. LPs were 10″ records at first, but soon the 12″ size became by far the most common.

LP