QNAP TS-328 Personal Cloud NAS Storage System

QNAP TS-328 Personal Cloud NAS Storage System

So, I bought one a few weeks back before they went on sale. It has quickly recovered from me turning it off at the wrong time and two power outages. Works like a charm! I only wish I had a 10gig network so it would back up faster.

Oh, and easy to set up once I got the hang of it.

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What drives did you load it up with?

This looks like it doesn’t come with any drives, does it come with just the one tray?

Once again, RAID5 gives a false sense of security with modern drive capacities. You will likely experience a soft read error during resilvering the replacement drive while replacing a failed drive. At that point you have zero redundancy and there goes your data.

People love to flame me because this truth is inconvenient and means they have to spend a lot more. But it’s the hard truth now, and if you’re getting something with only 2-4 bays and running RAID5 on it expecting that your investment is going to somehow protect your data in the event of a drive failure, you’re in for a rude awakening. I’m in IT professionally, managing many servers as well as consumer hardware, and see these things die all the time. Lots of users who have lost data as a result. Those in the industry know: RAID5 is dead.

Sorry it means you need to spend more to actually have RAID that will protect you, but ignore me at your own peril. Yes is sucks but so does spending money on junk like this only to have it fail you when you need it.

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So as someone who has 6 windows (7 to 10) pcs and laptops and iPads and iPhones what would you recommend as something they can all access to use the same data?

For the real computers: you can get this as long as you don’t care about RAID… you can use it as a striped volume and just make sure you’re keeping good backups (RAID is not a backup anyhow). If you actually need RAID (uptime, RAID is not a backup) then get a NAS device w/ at least 6 drives so you can do RAID6 (or preferably RAIDZ2). Or build your own NAS… they aren’t difficult or expensive.

For the non-computer devices (iPhone/iPads)… you’re better off just paying through the nose for iCloud since Apple doesn’t make anything else easy to use. There are probably iOS clients that can access an SMB or NFS share, but you’ll have to tediously shuttle files to and fro since it probably won’t access them natively. Or you can just use something like Dropbox, Box.net, OneDrive, etc. Or run ownCloud on your own hardware, but this is all a layer above and beyond just having a NAS since iOS devices are handicapped little toys versus being real computers, so their functionality is castrated.

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