Samsung & Sony Cameras


#1

#2

I have the Samsung DV-150 from a previous woot offer and I’m really disappointed because it has a lot of difficulty producing a non-blurry photo.


#3

Please tell us in what specific situations your pictures were “blurry.”


#4

I teach and write about digital photography and have in the past both been written up and written for national photo magazines.

One needs to ask a LOT of questions whenever a comment uses the term “blurry.”

You NEVER see “blurry” in professional camera reviews online or in magazines, as it says nothing about what was taken and under what conditions.

Often, it speaks volumes about the amount of effort the user has invested in understanding the mechanics of photography.

“Blurry” photos could be the result of a defective lens, but much more often are the result of taking photos in situations the camera was not designed to handle well.

Often, many users have absolutely no idea of the relationship between apertures, shutter speeds and ISOs.

They are also unaware that many long zoom lenses spend a lot of time at f/5.6 or f/8 and this is not the “right tool for the job” when trying to get a frozen-action shot in a gym.

I hear this “blurry” complaint all the time regarding $150 cameras and then point out that the pros are using huge $3,000 lenses and would they spend that much if a $150 camera worked as well??

Blurry can be camera shake (slow shutter), subject movement (slow shutter) lack of quick focus (slow system autofocus) or any combination of these.

But usually it is a person trying to shoot action in low light with the wrong lens for the job and an ISO (camera sensitivity) that results in 1/20th of a second exposure when a 1/1000th is needed.

Digital is NOT MAGIC, it just doesn’t use film.

While sensitivities are improving, we are not yet at the point where people can take all these shots they aspire to without spending five minutes to learn the limitations of their camera.

And the industry is not helping by giving the impression that some cameras can do things they simply cannot do.

I cannot stress enough to carefully consider WHAT KIND of photos you hope to take and then get a camera that (a) you can see clearly through and (b) has a lens and ISO level suitable for what you want to shoot. In some case, the $150 camera will be just fine, in others, you will have wasted your money. Good luck!


#5

What is the difference between refurbished and factory reconditioned? Is it the same thing? Thanks!


#6

Factory reconditioned means the manufacturer or certified partner did the reconditioning and refurbished means a third party handled the refurbishing.


#7

Do you ever wonder where these third parties come from? I suspect there is a pawnshop network that keeps a very low profile.


#8

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H300/B I got the last time it was offered was flawless.


#9

I do sometimes wonder that. I never thought about a pawnshop, and I highly doubt that’s the case. But regardless of what type of product is refurbed/reconditioned, I’m always curious.


#10

PawnAmerica is a national chain. For a while they were flooded with iPads, etc., and there is always of newish DSLR or two in the case. I suspect there is a reason why they never drop the price of these “desirable” items too low, as they may have a private refurb buyer at any time. Keep in mind that if these items were from defaulted pawns, they have very little money tied up in them. May also explain why some items look like new and others a scratched, etc. Just my guess.


#11

I bought the purple version of the Samsung WB35F a few weeks ago and I’m not as thrilled with it as I had hoped…but it’s probably not terrible either. I haven’t tried any outdoor shots yet (too freakin’ cold…haven’t managed to make myself spend any amount of time outside)

There’s a smart auto feature that I had hoped would help so I wouldn’t have to mess with the settings so much…but it didn’t… The color came out all wrong and the pictures wouldn’t seem to get into focus. I tried playing with the different settings for different lighting modes, forcing flash on/off, etc and eventually got a good picture. So the camera can take a good picture, you just have to be willing to play with it some. Smart Auto is useless – at least indoors. Also, there’s this constant hum that it makes as long as the camera is turned on. My previous camera wasn’t so noisy. It probably isn’t as noticeable when there’s some ambient noise around. I couldn’t tell that the image stabilization made much difference on or off.

I bought the camera to take on a trip to Australia, so I’m really hoping the outdoor Smart Auto works better. I’d hate to have to change the settings for each individual shot.


#12

At least you are experimenting with settings! Good for you!

"Digital is NOT MAGIC, it just doesn’t use film.

While sensitivities are improving, we are not yet at the point where people can take all these shots they aspire to without spending five minutes to learn the limitations of their camera.

And the industry is not helping by giving the impression that some cameras can do things they simply cannot do."