Scheppach 6 1/4-inch Blade Plunge Saw

Fares surprisingly well compared to Festool’s rail saw.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?198707-Tool-review-Scheppach-versus-Festool-track-saws

I just bought a grizzly track saw seen here http://www.grizzly.com/products/Track-Saw/T10687. Looks like a knock off of this saw. For longer tracks, the grizzly tracks will probably work.

A few happy amazonians

I just use a Skill worm drive saw and keep a real steady hand. Sometimes I won’t even draw a line.

Looks like a rebranded saw. Grizzly, Woodstar Divar 55, and this Scheppach all look the same. Look on youtube and you’ll see the same advertisement for both the Woodstar and the Scheppach. Also, the blade is 6 1/4", not 6 1/2" like most other track saws. May have a hard time finding replacement blades, or being limited in blade choice. Something to consider…

Ah, what t’hell is a plunge saw?

It has a universal motor, so it can run on AC/DC. It weighs only 10.6 pounds. There’s probably a lot of aluminum which is not heavy metal.

Scheppach Plunge saw uses the same size blade as Festool plunge saw. Festool provides a large variety of blades for their plunge saw which will fit the Scheppach Plunge saw.

Is this like a skill saw with training wheels?

Normally… one would have to frequent a Harbor Freight store to achieve this level of quality. Don’t plan on this tool becoming a family heirloom…

I could see a lot of instances this saw would be very handy - I do all sorts of wood building projects. Unfortunately I don’t have $120 lying around to blow on it.

if you’re a rep please introduce yourself

What these are really good for is cutting large pieces of plywood or MDF. Unfortunately, this has a fairly small track. Nonetheless, I’ve tried cutting even two foot pieces of plywood or MDF using a “home made” track and a circular saw, and it just did produce good results. Also, for MDF in particular, that product is too heavy and unwieldy to lift to attempt to use a table saw. That’s where these plunge saws come in handy.

Here is the deal -> this is not to be compared to a Festool track saw. It is not as good - not nearly as good - but it is 1/5 the price. You need to compare this against a regular circular saw with a guide - it is way, way better than that.

My main complaint, as others have stated, is that this is just not enough track, and I see no source for track other than at Grizzly (they sell a rebranded version of this saw) where they have 102" track or $200.

That’s pretty funny!

I’m a little confused on how this thing works. How do you ensure that the cut is square? If you’re cross cutting a 4X8 sheet, do you have to draw a line and then align the track or does it clamp down square?

This does not ensure the cut is square - it only helps make it straight. You measure to two spots, and line up the ends of the track to those measurements. You can/should clamp it at both ends. This model has some rubber pads on the bottom that supposedly keep it in place, but I wouldn’t trust them.

Thanks Seekins. Do you know if the cut aligns with the edge of the track or is it off a fraction of an inch. In other words, if you draw a line and put the track on that line will that be where the cut is or is it some fraction of an inch to the right of that line? For instance, when I want to square up the end of a board, I’ll often lay my triangle square on the board for a straight edge and run my skill saw against that edge but I must first align the blade with the cut then snug up my triangle square since I must account for the distance on the bottom plate of the saw between the straight edge and the blade. I’m wondering how you line up this saw so the blade precisely hits the line you want to cut.

We linked to extra track in the Features available through Scheppach via Amazon.