Serfas Cycling Shoes

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Serfas Cycling Shoes
Price: $39.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard OR $9 Two-Day OR $12 One-Day
Shipping Estimates: Ships in 1-2 business days (Thursday, Jan 30 to Friday, Jan 31) + transit
Condition: New

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Serfas Cycling Shoes
Price: $39.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard* or $9 Two-Day or *$12 One-Day
Condition: New

Comparison Links:
[Google Products](Serfas - Google Shopping Cycling Shoes) - [Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/s/?field-keywords=Serfas Cycling Shoes) - [Previous Woot Sales](Google Cycling Shoes)

Time to check out the product page

In case you are looking for a size chart

Sweet deal, about $100 everywhere including Amazon.

In for one if they have my size… cycling shoe’s usually run $80 - $100+… need some for spinning class.

Do these accommodate Speedplay cleats? With an adapter plate, I am sure anything is possible.

Seeing Podium model closeouts going back to 2009. Any ideas from which vintage this shipment originates?

these take SPD cleats? It seem to indicate it only accepts SPD-SL and SPD-R. Does it mean it can’t accept SPD cleats?

Zooming in it looks like they can take either 2 bolt (spd) or 3 bolt (spd-r or look) cleats.

These would be perfect spin class shoes, experience tells me that white shoes get filthy in a short period of time on the bike. There is also not much rubber on the bottom, so if you plan on doing much walking off the bike, it is more difficult and makes that funny clicking sound.

I recommend any commuting shoe like this one for people who want to get into riding clipless: http://www.jensonusa.com/!GJ4wcKJtx0h561sfm5iJxQ!/Shimano-SH-MT43-SPD-Mountain-Bike-Shoes

And, if you’re just getting into riding clipless pedals, you WILL fall over trying to unclip at a stop light. Your friends will laugh at you, and you’ll think about giving it up. Stick with it, it’s worth it eventually.

See this video for more tips:
[youtube=TEhySzO14ik][/youtube]

Been there, done that…Sheesh.

…a friend sent me that video yesterday. So funny, 'cause it’s true!

How well do these work for someone with wide feet?

Based on what I could find on their website, yes. The copy from woot is lifted from this listing, so I am making the assumption without the picture that this is the manufacturer listing.
https://www.serfas.com/products/view/578/referer:products|index|shoes|mens-road-shoes

To the person who asked about wide feet…I have a pair of Serfas (not the ones offered here, but I assume the sizing is the same) and they are wider than the other spinning shoes I tried on when I bought them. Although my feet aren’t so wide that I need to always purchase wide-sized shoes, they’re wide enough that I basically can’t comfortably wear about 2/3 of regular commercial shoes, especially strappy or pointy styles. These work for me, though.

These shoes will accept SPD, SPD-SL, and SPD-R (see the patterns below). SPD-R is pretty much “old school” now for track bikes and I don’t know of anyone that still supports it.

The common bolt-hole patterns.

http://plankroadcyclery.com/images/library/site/shim_bolt_patterns_06_p.gif

I commute most days on a touring bike with clipless pedals and MTB shoes. Overall, “clipless” pedals are safer and more efficient than flat pedals or toe clips and regular shoes. These shoes are for road bikes and are much less practical and convenient than mountain bike shoes. When you get off the bike, you end up walking like a duck.

Unless you’re a serious racer or need some specific feature that’s only available on road pedals, there is little to no advantage for road over MTB pedals and shoes. I use the same MTB-style pedals (Time ATAC) on my touring, road, and mountain bikes and the same pair of walkable shoes for all of them.

Are they true to size and are they the sizes we are suppose to wear? My old pair that I use to wear use to hug my feet from heel to toe and were 2 european sizes than my shoe size. Should I buy them based on my sneaker/shoe size?

Same here. Somewhere around Spruce and 20th street in Philly. Plenty of folks around to enjoy it.