Why are all the cool phones for GSM, not CDMA?


#1

Since the woot for today is a phone, thought I’d throw out a question.

Why are all the cool, techy phones for GSM networks but not CDMA networks? Can’t they just change the receiving technology and offer a version of the phone for each type of network?

It seems like here in the states all the “cool” or “sexy” phones go to Cingular or one of the other GSM network carriers, while Verizon (my carrier) plods along with standard, boring phones.

Granted, I could just switch to one of the GSM carriers, but that doesn’t work for my situation. Verizon is clearly the best carrier for my personal situation. But man, i do get tech envy when I see all the cool stuff coming out for GSM only!

I mean, check this phone out: [link]http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/09/30/review_imate_jasjar/[/link]

now that’s a sexy phone.


#2

To be fair, ALL phones suck in the U.S. At least comparatively speaking to mobile handsets from other countries, particularly in Asia. GSM is the standard the world over … except for the U.S. Kinda like Baseball. Because other countries have generally had one technology to go by, they have managed to advance much more quickly in terms of their wireless technology, ergo, the cooler phones.

Because of this, GSM phones work as “world phones” although the roaming charges can be a real bitch.


#3

CDMA is actually a better network, but because GSM has spread across the globe, it has become the leading service. CDMA is more secure, and has a higher bandwidth and transfer rate.

it’s another one of those “there are a dozen cleaner, more efficient, cheaper ways to fuel automobiles, but the infrastructure for Gasoline is in place”, making it the leader.


#4

i have heard an unsubstantiated rumor that in europe they are slowly trying to phase in CDMA for its superior features, but it seems unlikely given the amount of investment companies made into GSM infrastructure. i think it would be pretty convenient to just switch a SIM card out to move your number and contacts, instead of having to pay $10 to get your contacts switched over with their computer that does it always being down, though the number switch to a new phone on CDMA seems pretty easy (as long as the sales associate doesn’t program a bunch of zeroes into your phone…)


#5

[quote user=“blank”]CDMA is actually a better network, but because GSM has spread across the globe, it has become the leading service. CDMA is more secure, and has a higher bandwidth and transfer rate.

it’s another one of those “there are a dozen cleaner, more efficient, cheaper ways to fuel automobiles, but the infrastructure for Gasoline is in place”, making it the leader.[/quote]
sorta like VHS vs betamax.

i do have a quick question … are GSM phones overseas “locked”? specifically, if i bought a GSM phone in mexico, say for telcel, can i only use it for telcel or can i stick my tmobile sim in there?

or is it the same as in the u.s. where you would have to buy an “unlocked” phone? thanks much.


#6

[quote user=“the.ronin”]
sorta like VHS vs betamax.

i do have a quick question … are GSM phones overseas “locked”? specifically, if i bought a GSM phone in mexico, say for telcel, can i only use it for telcel or can i stick my tmobile sim in there?

or is it the same as in the u.s. where you would have to buy an “unlocked” phone? thanks much.[/quote]

It is entirely phone by phone basis. Some companies, like Nokia, don’t lock their phones worldwide. Other companies, like Sanyo, lock them everywhere.

If you want any assistance, here is a good source for phone information

http://gsmhelp.info/


#7

To be fair, ALL phones suck in the U.S. At least comparatively speaking to mobile handsets from other countries, particularly in Asia. GSM is the standard the world over … except for the U.S. Kinda like Baseball. Because other countries have generally had one technology to go by, they have managed to advance much more quickly in terms of their wireless technology, ergo, the cooler phones.

Because of this, GSM phones work as “world phones” although the roaming charges can be a real bitch.


#8

CDMA is actually a better network, but because GSM has spread across the globe, it has become the leading service. CDMA is more secure, and has a higher bandwidth and transfer rate.

it’s another one of those “there are a dozen cleaner, more efficient, cheaper ways to fuel automobiles, but the infrastructure for Gasoline is in place”, making it the leader.


#9

i have heard an unsubstantiated rumor that in europe they are slowly trying to phase in CDMA for its superior features, but it seems unlikely given the amount of investment companies made into GSM infrastructure. i think it would be pretty convenient to just switch a SIM card out to move your number and contacts, instead of having to pay $10 to get your contacts switched over with their computer that does it always being down, though the number switch to a new phone on CDMA seems pretty easy (as long as the sales associate doesn’t program a bunch of zeroes into your phone…)


#10

sorta like VHS vs betamax.

i do have a quick question … are GSM phones overseas “locked”? specifically, if i bought a GSM phone in mexico, say for telcel, can i only use it for telcel or can i stick my tmobile sim in there?

or is it the same as in the u.s. where you would have to buy an “unlocked” phone? thanks much.


#11

It is entirely phone by phone basis. Some companies, like Nokia, don’t lock their phones worldwide. Other companies, like Sanyo, lock them everywhere.

If you want any assistance, here is a good source for phone information

http://gsmhelp.info/