Yukon Outfitters Hammocks (5 Colors)

it brings back the made in usa camo 500lbs cap version
or it gets the hose again

The design of the mosquito net is crap. They need to quit making this design. The 2 rows of loops along the top are terrible. Should be a single.

Couldn’t find this deal last summer when we wanted hammocks and had to buy some generic cheapies (same price). So if your even remotely interested in some good ones I’d spring for a couple. Or kids really like setting em up and sleeping in them. Don’t worry about the quality, if you need something super heavy duty then you’d have to spend much, much more. Yukon is a good name for stuff like this. Now we’re looking at the rain flies and sleeping bags for our hammock campers.

Yes, the Two row design isn’t ideal, but I usually find a 12-15in stick to place between the two rows (mid hammock). This, along with stringing the included cord, gives plenty of open space above you in the hammock. The stick stays in place with no fuss all night.

Still great for the price.

Ha. “Yukon” equipment not available in Alaska.

…and they are made in Tennessee. But, to be fair, most of AK is a little more NW than the Yukon. If they don’t ship to the Yukon, that would be ironic.

Is the mosquito net removable?

I don’t think so, because the description says: “If the coast is clear and you don’t need the mosquito netting, just flip the hammock over and use as a normal hammock.”

But I will check with the vendor just to be sure.

UPDATE: From the vendor:
Mosquito net is integrated for our line of mosquito hammocks. If there’re no bugs around, you can flip the hammock over and use without the netting.

How do you get into these things? Slit through the bottom?

@Theonlyrealcolin

Our line of Mosquito Hammocks feature integrated netting. It’s not removable, but it’s very portable, easy to pack away, and if you don’t need it you can always flip it over and use as a normal hammock.

Close up of the dual sided zippers:

http://i65.tinypic.com/1gn0ic.jpg

@Welfarebum

Entrance would be from the side. Added an arrow to the below pic to showcase where the zippers are located.

http://i63.tinypic.com/1432j4w.png

Thanks for checking us out!

The listing showed a listed weight of 19.5 oz and mine just arrived and weighs 24.5 oz hmmmm
Removing the 2 heavy steel screw links dropped it to 20.4oz ill use aluminum carabiners or just cordage and tree straps to keep the weight down

Interesting… Does everything else appear as described?

Yes, i havent hung it yet, just unrolled it but it looks really good and includes lightweight stretchy cord(s. There may be two in the roll) to hold up the net, no cordage for actual hammock hanging but im gonna find superlight webbing/cord combo locally or online.
For the price im giving it a shot as my first backpacking hammock

Well that’s good. I’m sorry about the weight being off. Is that going to be a big issue for you when using the hammock? I want to make sure that overall you’re happy with the purchase.

I purchased 5: 3 on Amazon when Woot had it on sale there and 2 here. One of each color for our group of people. I have to undo the knot on the included rope and retie it using double overhand knot to make it more secure.

Do these have a footbox?

Not per se - it’s a gathered-end hammock, so in that sense it’s just like a sheet that’s been tied at both ends to make a sling.

I only know of one design that has a footbox; http://www.amokequipment.com/

Beware that the Amok design starts around $400 :wink:

I’ve been a tree hanger for about 15 years. Please please please use webbing around the trees to avoid damage! There are a number of great rigging systems available, the best of which include long daisy chains. The advantage of the daisy chain systems is that you can use a simple constrictor loop around the tree, and then hook straight into one of the loops with minimal fuss.

The down side is you can’t tweak tension unless you use another rope for adjustment. I do recommend starting with better carabiners than come with most hanging rigs, which are usually steel. Get a pair of $8 aluminum climbing 'biners to cut weight and remove sharp edges.

I also recommend replacing the poly cord that gathers the hammock with a 12"-18" climbing runner. This will be a little easier than using the supplied rope and hook.

Finally, be aware that during rain, or even heavy mist/fog, water can run down your lines and get into your hammock. This isn’t much of a problem with daisy chain systems, but read up on drip lines (or drip string) to help avoid water pooling in your hammock.

Does it come with the ropes to hang the hammock itself?
The specs says yes - hanging ropes but someone here mentioned otherwise. Thanks!