Greenworks Snow Throwers

Greenworks Snow Throwers

When I think to myself, “Self, what should I turn to when the snows come in terms of thrower machines to ensure my back has to do as little work as possible and which can handle whatever Mother Nature throws at me”, I think battery powered snowthrowers.

-No One, Ever.

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On the other hand, my 2 cycle gas powered single stage blower is hard to start and something breaks every other year but my Toro plug in electric shovel is still working after 10 years. No repairs necessary. Electric can be good if made correctly. These I’m not sure about as they have plastic blades if I’m not mistaken. How long can that last?

I bought one of the corded one last year for $99 on an amazon one-day deal of the day. It lasted the Wisconsin winter without a problem, the blades are in great shape yet. My old 2-stage unit is a beast to start and the maintenance on it sucks. The electric one is simple and easy for 95% of the time we get snow.

Mine does tend to max out at about 6-8 inches of snow; so if you’re at that point and it’s still coming down its a good idea to make a trip outside to get rid of the stuff already on the ground. Most snow falls are under that amount here so it’s not really that big of a deal for me. It’ll usually handle the snow plow wash at the end of the drive way as long as it’s not frozen in place, but you’ve got to go slow and take off a few inches each time.

I’d love to get a battery one someday, but for now the cord works fine. Just make sure you’ve got a good winter rated cord that can handle the amperage.

I’ll be a little more kind, the scenarios where this thing are useful are limited to a couple of inches of light snow. Single stage snowthrowers are all but useless in anything else.
I had an elderly dad with a couple of snowthrowers(corded and gas), they were light enough for him to handle and were “ok” if he kept after it during a snowstorm. Every time I started using a snowthrower, I was shovelling within minutes.
I was brought up trained in the yankee school of “there’s nothing more satisfying than a shoveled driveway” and really enjoyed those snowy new england evenings tossing snow. Then I bought an Ariens two-stage and wondered what the f&*( I was thinking for the past 40yrs. (I was also in the “why does anyone need a riding mower when a walk behind mower is so simple” camp until my wife got me a yard tractor this year.

Yeah, if all you get is a dusting or very light, DRY snow, this thing probably has a purpose. But I’m reading some of the reviews and people are talking about “look at it handling these eight inches of snow!” and their photo is like…2". One of the top photos is “showing off” how amazing the thing is, and in the thing’s trail is…a bunch of snow. Some people just want to convince themselves something is better than it is because “the environment”.

It seems with anything more than a dusting, you have to go over the snow multiple times, chipping away at it a couple of inches at a time, and that the thing clogs like mad. Personally, I’d rather only have to go over it once and be done with it, even if that means every 2 years I have to pay $25 to have a guy tune up the engine.

I live in San Diego, so this is perfect for me. Should last a while, it never snows.

Haha! I love looking at the sales stats on snow blowers. This time I notice Texas has a very slight tint to it. Looks like a snowbird bought one for his brother in law up north! :wink:

Not to beat a dead horse but issue with these things was always the weight of what they’re throwing. If you have heavy wet snow and you start in the middle of your 15’ wide driveway, it’s throwing the snow a couple of feet, so that means your next pass has to be a little narrower, say 3/4 of the width of the blower. the snow is even heavier so it’s not even throwing that far. well your third pass has to be narrower than that because now instead of 3" of snow you’re trying to throw 6" of snow, by the time you get to the last couple of passes you’re only using a fraction of the throwers width and thinking “I might as well be shoveling”.
Corded is a great idea, I still have my dad’s old extension cord that used to use on the electric thrower, patched together over and over again.

Worked great the first time. Took many many tries for it to start today, the second time. Died in middle of driveway less than halfway done. Ugh

I’m sorry to hear that. Remember that you have a 4-year warranty with Greenworks.