Lots For Fans Of Pots & Pans


#1

#2

I spy a KitchenAid pan! Anyone tried that one out?


#3

Has anybody tried the Regal Ware stainless everyday pan? I’m always tempted to try one, but have never seen one in a store and wonder if they are decently heavy pans or kind of flimsy. I’d appreciate any help.
Thanks


#4

I don’t have that, but I do have the twelve-quart stock pot, and it is very well made. Since the every day pan seems to be tri-ply, while mine only has an encapsulated aluminum disc on the bottom, I would expect it to be better.

I would be very surprised if it isn’t a great pan. And it’s got a twenty-five year warranty.


#5

Thank you for the help. I may weaken this time and go ahead and order it.


#6

Here is a great infomercial for pans.

[youtube=XRWwEWHjO34][/youtube]


#7

Not an accomplished cook but bought the now sold-out saute pan in the hopes of getting an exterior texture on chicken, etc. which I just can’t get with a nonstick pan. Been looking for a while and this one seems well-built.

Question for the more advanced cooks: why would someone prefer not to have a nonstick stockpot?


#8

Even though I’m a fan of Cast Iron, as well as Lodge, I’m passing on this dutch oven. Don’t do much campfire cooking.

But, if it had a “!” on it, I might reconsider. (Even an “i” would work.)

steve


#9

I purchased this back in October for $5 more. I love this pan. I use it as a sauté pan and as a covered casserole. This is a good quality tri-ply, not flimsy at all. I am glad I invested in it.


#10

I don’t claim to be an advanced cook. I think the reason to use a stainless steel stock pot is so that you can sear your meats and sauté the aromatics before adding the liquids and other ingredients.

I purchased the tri-ply stock pot in a previous woot. I am impressed with the quality and love using it.


#11

One reason I prefer to avoid nonstick is because I’m not always great at remembering that you can’t make them too hot without risking the nonstick finish. I’d rather have a metal I might discolor at most than a weird teflon/whatever thing that’ll flake or separate or off-gas into my food.

What I’m saying is that I’m too lazy even for nonstick.


#12

For one thing there aren’t that many large, heavy non-stick stock pots out there. For another, it’s hard to see what’s going on sometimes when the surface is dark. For a third, I don’t like to be limited in what utensils I can use. Finally, I don’t see the benefit. I’d rather my money be spent on the thickness of the metal. I want a stock pot I will keep forever, not just as long as the surface remains bonded.

The aforementioned browning is a good reason not to a non-stick surface, too.

I’m not opposed to using a non-stick pan when it is needed. I’ve got one that I use for eggs, crepes, omelets, etc.) that are prone to sticking. I’d just rather not use it when it isn’t called for. I am not afraid of overheating it and releasing gasses or ingesting (inert) flakes. I would just rather cook on metal.


#13

As a couple people have mentioned already, nonstick in a stockpot is not necessary for several reasons.

One, you are usually cooking for a long time at a temperature that is not recommended for nonstick since the coating is usually made of a host of chemicals that will release into fumes. Admittedly, Teflon says that’s about 400*F, but if you’re opting for cheaper pans or there’s a flaw in the surface then that temp could be lower.

Most good quality stock pots (I picked up mine for about $70 on sale, worth every penny) will ‘release’ any gunk from cooking after a good soap&water soak overnight. Discoloration can be avoided by using a cookware cleaner a few times a year. I bought some for $4 at a kitchen supplies store, but it still has the wrapping on it.

Finally, nonstick coatings are not permanent – the bonding to the metal of the pot will eventually give out and the coating will begin to flake off. Not exactly what you want ending up in your food, especially that pot of chili you’ve been simmering for hours. So, you’re paying for something (a coating) that will guaranteed break down and make the pot unusable in the future.


#14

Is the Caldero suitable for frying chicken? Cut in small pieces.
I had a scary no injury incident with hot oil, but I dont want a electric fryer(That would set a unacceptable food president).
If their is another pan type better suited under $30 please do tell.

Thanx,
Zoe


#15

I love, love, love my Fagor stainless steel pressure cooker! 'Best black beans, lentils, or rice I ever had were made quickly & energy-efficiently in this thing. Best steamed artichokes, too. Fast food can be healthy after all. I can walk away from cooking corn on the cob it in and know it’s done when there’s a sudden corn aroma being released into the air. Fast to clean and safe too. I use it 3 times a week. It’s a terrific gift for a vegetarian, 'tho it handles meat well too.


#16

I’ll say! I didn’t vote for him!


#17

Thank you all for the excellent input on nonstick v non-nonstick stock pots. You all really covered the waterfront!! Three cheers for the Woot community!!


#18

I haven’t used Regal Ware so I cannot speak to the brand, but I do use Calphalon non stick cookware and I have been most pleased by it.

In particular, I use non-stick Calphalon Contemporary pans that can also be used in the oven up to 450 degrees. It is quite versatile. The only drawbacks are cost and the cookware must be hand washed.


#19

Is the RegalWare Tri Ply Induction compatible? I’m looking at the 2Qt saucepan and the 8Q stockpot.


#20

Bought the RegalWare 12" non stick Fry pan, from Woot not long ago! LOVE IT!!! Best pan I own! My husband says I need to start upgrading to RegalWare!